General Articles

9/2/2020 | By Terri L. Jones

As we shake the sand out of our beach bags, trade our flip-flops for closed-toed shoes, and move from the carefree summer life into the more business-as-usual days of fall, most of us usually begin to feel a little down in the dumps. It’s a state of mind that is born during our school days and is hard to shake no matter how old we get.

Avoiding Those End-of-Summer Blues

But 2020 is a little different (well, actually, a lot different!). Because this year we’ve had to forgo many of those iconic events of summer; Fourth of July celebrations, family barbecues, outdoor concerts, and even walking down a crowded boardwalk. We probably feel like we haven’t had a summer at all. June, July, and August have felt like just a string of generic months; they could’ve fallen at any point in the year!

A lot of our time has been spent cooped up inside our homes reading, binge-watching TV and cooking (maybe even virtual traveling). When we have been outdoors, we’ve steered clear of other people on walks; visited with grandkids through windows and across yards; socially distanced at the park; and spaced out our chairs at the pool. That’s hardly the kind of summer most of us have grown to love.

As days get shorter and temperatures cooler, the weather will be the only clear demarcation between the fall that’s approaching and the summer we’re bidding adieu. (Kind of like the days have melded into the nights and the weeks into the weekends for the past five and a half months.) My guess is that we will unobtrusively glide from summer into fall without any wistfulness or regret whatsoever. We’ll leave this “season that never was” behind with barely a glance over our shoulder.

Perhaps we simply need to take this as a win. Escaping those dreaded end-of-summer blues could be one of the few good things to come out of 2020!

Terri L. Jones

Terri L. Jones has been writing educational and informative topics for the senior industry for over ten years, and is a frequent and longtime contributor to Seniors Guide. She also writes for many other local magazines and publications.

Terri L. Jones